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Exercises To Help Accessory Navicular Syndrome


Overview
An accessory navicular bone is an accessory bone of the foot that occasionally develops abnormally in front of the ankle towards the inside of the foot. This bone may be present in approximately 2-14% of the general population and is usually asymptomatic. When it is symptomatic, surgery may be necessary. Surgery How can we increase our height? be performed at any age because it does not alter any other bones.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
People who have an accessory navicular often are unaware of the condition if it causes no problems. However, some people with this extra bone develop a painful condition known as accessory navicular syndrome when the bone and/or posterior tibial tendon are aggravated. This can result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse.

Symptoms
This painful condition is called accessory navicular syndrome. Accessory navicular syndrome (ANS) can cause significant pain in the mid-foot and arch, especially with activity. Redness and swelling may develop over this bony prominence, as well as extreme sensitivity to pressure. Sometimes people may be unable to wear shoes because the area is too sensitive.

Diagnosis
Upon examining a foot with a symptomatic accessory navicular, there will often be a bony prominence on the inside of the foot, just below and in front of the inside ankle bone (medial malleolus). The size of this prominence will vary from small to quite large. Pressing over this area will often cause discomfort. There may be an associated flat foot deformity as this can occur in patients with an accessory navicular. Stressing the posterior tibial tendon by raising the heel up and down on one foot, or by forcing the foot to the inside against resistance, may aggravate the symptoms as these maneuvers stress the posterior tibial tendon which is attached on the inside of the accessory navicular bone. Patients may walk with a slight limp due to the pain.

Non Surgical Treatment
Although operative treatment, and removal of the accessory navicular is possible, this is not usually indicated at first. Conservative nonoperative treatment is best, the course depending on the severity of the symptoms. When the pain is very severe, which could indicate a fracture, a period of immobilization might be required. This is done by waring a fracture boot, or a cast, which can help the ossicle stay stable, aiding in healing. Immobilization usually lasts between 4 to 6 weeks. Afterwards, physical therapy exercise, or any appropriate home course, should be used to help strengthen the ankle and return the ankle and foot to full range of motion, and have no pain on movement. Sometimes crutches are used when weight bearing is too painful, but it is best to try to bear weight when possible.

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment
Surgery may be an option if non-surgical treatment does not decrease the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome. Since this bone is not needed for the foot to function normally, Your surgeon may remove the accessory navicular, reshape the area, and repair the posterior tibial tendon for improved function.

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What Is Accessory Navicular Syndrome


Overview
An accessory navicular is a fairly uncommon condition which is rarely symptomatic. Oftentimes non-surgical treatment is successful. In the minority of cases, surgical intervention is required. Patients typically do very well with conservative and surgical treatment. Athletic activities can usually be restarted once symptoms have improved or the patient has recovered from surgery.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
It What is the Ilizarov method? commonly believed that the posterior tibial tendon loses its vector of pull to heighten the arch. As the posterior muscle contracts, the tendon is no longer pulling straight up on the navicular but must course around the prominence of bone and first pull medially before pulling upward. In addition, the enlarged bones may irritate and damage the insertional area of the posterior tibial tendon, making it less functional. Therefore, the presence of the accessory navicular bone does contribute to posterior tibial dysfunction.

Symptoms
The symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome commonly arise during adolescence, when bones are maturing and cartilage fuses into bone. In other instances, symptoms do not appAccessory Navicularear until adulthood. The signs and symptoms include a visible bony prominence on the midfoot the inner side of the foot above the arch. Redness or swelling of the bony prominence. Indistinct pain or throbbing in the midfoot and arch during or after physical activity.

Diagnosis
Your podiatrist will most likely diagnose accessory navicular syndrome by making a visual study of the area, checking whether the shape of your foot and your ability to move it indicate there?s an accessory navicular lurking around. He or she may push on the prominence on your foot to check to see if it hurts, and may ask you to walk around in order to ascertain how your gait is affected. In order to get a certain diagnosis, your podiatrist will need some way to see the inside of your foot, which will most likely involve getting X-rays, or possibly an MRI or some other scan of your foot?s interior.

Non Surgical Treatment
The initial treatment approach for accessory navicular is non-operative. An orthotic may be recommended or the patient may undergo a brief period of casting to rest the foot. For chronic pain, however, the orthopedic surgeon removes the extra bone, a relatively simple surgery with a brief rehabilitation period and a very good success rate.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
In the original Kidner procedure, the entire posterior tibial tendon was released from the navicular and then rerouted through a drill hole placed through the navicular. The original Kidner procedure is now rarely used as a means of treating an isolated accessory navicular. Instead, a modification of the Kidner procedure has become more commonplace. The modified Kidner procedure consists of carefully removing the accessory and anchoring the posterior tibial tendon to the surface of the navicular where the accessory was removed. The repair may be done by passing a suture through the tendon and then through drill holes in the navicular, or by using a suture anchor.

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